Child-led learning Archives

  1. Not sorry

    We make it into Yellowstone at least once a week right now.  It requires a lot more effort than in the warmer months, but it is worth it.  From the moment I enter those borders, I am home. (This is Richie, the girls’ hiking mascot.  Every kid should have a mascot, don’t you think?)  :)…

  2. Read, read, and read some more

    I think that one of the best and easiest ways to open the minds of your children to new thoughts, new ideas, and new places comes through reading.  I believe that reading opens the door to more interests and ideas and concepts than anything else. Take the past 24 hours, for example.  I love to…

  3. Wait for the right questions to come up

    (By the way, I am really bummed that I haven’t posted much this summer.  We’ve just been having so much fun, that really, I have had no time for blogging.  It’s been an amazing summer, but I do have a lot I want to talk about in this space, so I am hoping to be…

  4. Time to become

    If there is anything that Yellowstone has taught us, it is patience.  Quiet, pleasant patience. That things take time, and sometimes the time is long and that rushing does no good. Last week, it rained and rained.  And rained.  It was wonderful.  I am grateful for ponchos and sweatshirts.  The chilly weather gave us a…

  5. Listen in Addition

    As an unschooling mom, I hate all things involving drills.  Though I know it is a commonly used technique to master math facts, I prefer to look for other ways to get my kids familiar with math. Two things seem to be prevalent when successful learning takes place in our home: a no-stress environment, and…

  6. Don’t be afraid to fail!

    This.  In this brilliant article, Bloomberg columnist Megan McArdle writes about a conversation with a young girl in 10th grade.  This girl is so afraid of not getting an “A” that she is afraid to try anything new.  In our current system of education, kids almost have to get a 4.0 to feel like they…

  7. Fighting for childhood

    I don’t really know what to say in this post.  I feel so frustrated that in this current society, we have to fight to let our children have a childhood.  When did it become the norm to steal that from them? When did it stop becoming okay for a child to spend the day in…

  8. Directed-attention fatigue

    “Too much directed attention leads to…”directed-attention fatigue,” marked by impulsive behavior, agitation, and inability to concentrate.  Directed-attention fatigue occurs because neural inhibitory mechanisms become fatigued by blocking competing stimuli.  As Stephen Kaplan explained in the journal Monitor on Psychology, ‘If you can find an environment where the attention is automatic, you allow directed attention to…

  9. Famous Unschoolers: Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Anderson

    Jamie Anderson is the next in our famous unschooler’s series, and this is especially fun, because, unlike the others we have covered so far, she is a contemporary!  Jamie is the first woman to win gold in slopestyle snowboarding. Jamie with her mom (photo credit: Mike Stobe/Getty Images) In an interview with Today, Jamie’s mom…

  10. Where do place your value?

    It happens all-too-often:  I run into a homeschooling parent that thinks the way I once did, and I cringe for days afterward.  Did I truly once rate my value as a parent and a facilitator of education by how “far ahead” my children were than others?  Did I truly once worry so much about how…

  11. All I am saying in this book can be summed up in two words – Trust Children. Nothing could be more simple – or more difficult. Difficult, because to trust children we must trust ourselves – and most of us were taught as children that we could not be trusted.

    John Holt

  12. Some people talk about play as if it were a relief from serious learning or even worse: a waste of time. But for children, play is exceedingly serious…and important! In fact, play is a way for children to learn who they are, how the world works, solve problems, and to express feelings. Yes, play is…

    Fred Rogers